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UK still a top destination for migrants | Immigration Matters

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Despite the so called downturn in the economy, more permanent migrants moved to Britain than any other leading developed country except America, The Daily Telegraph reports.

A total of 397,900 immigrants headed for the UK in 2009, with only the USA recording a higher figure, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

And only Mexico saw a larger growth in numbers on the previous year, the annual Migration Outlook report concluded.

The UK was one of only seven of the 34 leading industrialised nations that saw a growth in immigration in that year.

The trend suggests Britain remained a key destination for migrants during Labour’s last full year in office.

Figures earlier this month showed the population is growing at its fastest rate for half a century, driven by immigration and a baby boom.

The number of new permanent migrants in the UK in 2009 was 14 per cent higher than the previous year, according to the OECD.

Mexico saw a 58 per cent increase but overall numbers were much smaller with 23,900 moving there in 2009.

America saw more than 1.1 million immigrants arrive.

Overall, OECD countries, on average, saw a fall in migration which the report blamed on a shrinking jobs market.

But Secretary-General Angel Gurria predicted that trend would change again as soon as the world economies fully recover.

Damian Green, the immigration minister, said: “We are in the process of fixing the immigration system we inherited.

“Net migration has been too high but the controls and reforms we are introducing will bring it back down to an annual level in the tens of thousands.

“We have already introduced an annual limit on the number of non EU workers that can come to the UK and have radically overhauled the student route.

“ We are currently consulting on restricting settlement rights to break the link between temporary and permanent migration and a consultation on the family route will follow very shortly.”

Immigration to the United Kingdom from Bulgaria currently rank as the fifth highest group, a survey by UK National Statistics said.

The numbers are based on comparison of immigration levels between 2004 and 2010. During this period the number of Bulgarian immigrants in the UK increased four-fold from 11 000 in 2004 to more than 53 000 in 2010.

The statistics are also indicating an altering trend in immigration patterns in the UK. Ever since countries from Central and Eastern Europe were accepted into the EU, the UK been a favourite destination, for Eastern Europeans seeking a better life.

All of top five nations fuelling the rise in Britain’s immigration are from Central and Eastern Europe, the report said.

See article:

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website 

See article:

 

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website

See also:

Bulgarian immigration increasing despite UK restrictions

UK Border Agency announce rules to extend of stay for skilled workers in ‘closed’ work schemes

New ‘Yellow Card’ form causing confusion for Romanians and Bulgarians

Immigration News weekly round up 10 July 2011

BR1 Form for ‘Yellow Card’ Registration revised

New Tier 4 student visa rules now in force

If you are affected by the closure of any nursing home and need any immigration advice, or are worried about the new immigration rules, or need help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

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