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UK immigration fall unlikely in 2011 say leading think tank | Immigration Matters

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The Institute for Public Policy Research (ippr), a leading think tank, predicts that there will not be a dramatic drop in immigration to the UK in 2010, and net migration for 2011 would be unlikely to fall much below 200,000 – the same annual level it has been at for much of the last decade.

The forecast comes at a time when the recently elected coalition government is introducing drastic measures to restrict immigration in order to meet the Conservative election pledge of reducing net immigration “from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of thousands”.

The influential think tank said that if the UK economy continued to perform more strongly relative to Eurozone countries such as Spain, Portugal and Greece, there might be an increase in EU immigrants and these are not affected by next year’s annual cap.

The ippr also estimates an increased influx of people coming in from Ireland, with 120,000 Irish nationals expected to leave the Republic in 2010 and 2011. And continued inflows from Eastern Europe are also likely – the latest data on numbers coming from Lithuania and Latvia showed an increase from 25,000 a year to 40,000 a year. Also, foreign student numbers have been growing dramatically in recent years (more than doubling between 2001 and 2008) and the number of study-related visas in 2010 is likely to top 300,000.

Nick Pearce, ippr director, said:

“A sharp drop in immigration is unlikely to happen in 2011 on current trends, so ministers must be careful to manage down public expectations. The cap on skilled migration from outside the EU, which the government has already been put in place, could hurt the economic recovery. Other hasty measures to reduce numbers artificially would be even more damaging.

“Bringing down the level of immigration, which has been high in recent years, is a legitimate policy goal. But this should be done by making long term and sustainable reforms to the structure of our economy and labour market.” Source: ippr. 

The news will unfortunately be of little comfort to potential non-EU migrants and students who have seen their routes to the UK blocked by a series of measures this year including an interim immigration cap, later ruled illegal by a High Court Judge, the closure of Tier 1 and a raft of rule changes to the Tier 4 student visa scheme.

In December Immigration Minister Damian Green announced a new public consultation of the reform of the student visa system (implemented last year) and promised ‘tougher entrance criteria, limits on work and an end to students staying in the UK to look for a job’.

The government has little control over the numbers of EU immigrants and those exercising EEA rights. In addition, the end of restrictions free movement of labour imposed on Romanian and Bulgarian Citizens is just around the corner.

With many EU member economies going south the UK is still an attractive safe haven for millions of workers.

The only way David Cameron can reduce net migration below ten thousand is to tear up treaties and effectively pull out of the European Union.

See article:

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website 

See article:

 

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website

See also:

New Tier 2 Working Visa limit set following Judicial Review 

UK Border Agency’s response to Judicial review loss on interim immigration cap

Interim Immigration Cap unlawful High Court Judges Rule

New rules for Extended Student Visitor Visa for migrants studying English language courses

British MPs voice ‘profound concern’ over Home Office plans to bar foreign students

Irish emigration levels similar to the 1980s

Government lays down plans to reform UK student visa system and launch public consultation 

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Tier 2 Working Visas, Visa, ILR, Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

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5 Responses to “UK immigration fall unlikely in 2011 say leading think tank”
Read them below or add one

  1. joshua aubin says :

    It is sad to hear this, if you think about immigration this way, then know where it started from, moreover they have been very good people. If you insult immigration you insult the royal family.

    Although Royals don’t tend to use a last name, in the instance of a marriage, for example, Prince William’s last name is Mountbatten-Windsor. This is the surname of all descendents of Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth II excluding females who marry.

    The name Mountbatten-Windsor derives from the Royal surname Windsor, decided in 1917 by George V. Before this, the Royal surname was technically Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, but due to anti-German sentiment after WWI, the decision was made to change the royal surname to Windsor.

    In 1960, the Queen and Prince Philip decided to create a surname for their direct descendants, incorporating the surnames ‘Windsor’ and Prince Philip’s previous surname, ‘Mountbatten’.

    Therefore, Mountbatten-Windsor is the surname of all male, and unmarried female descendents of Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth II including Charles, William and Harry.

  2. Worldwide says :

    @ realistic
    Did you forget about 1 million Brits living in Spain? And Spain is just one example…
    How many Spanish people did you heard complaining about this? There are hundred of thousands of Brits in Portugal, Greece, Cyprus etc and nobody is complaining. Why do you Brits needs to cry every time when someone enter in your rainy country!? Stop moaning please, everytime you point a finger, there’s always 3 fingers pointing back at you
    “British jobs for British people” – I’ve never heard such a stupid thing in my entire life!
    Regards!

  3. […] UK immigration fall unlikely in 2011 say leading think tank […]

  4. every far eastern woman who come to “study” in this country finds an English guy get married with him stay in here forever and have far eastern children.

    The same goes to many of the Nigerian man who get married with English girls and get Nigerian children.

    In this way there is no future for the British nation.

    The EU people get into society and disappear within 2 generations… has always been like this.

  5. […] UK Immigration drop unlikely in 2011 say leading think tank […]

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