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UK firms plan to recruit more EU migrants to fill job vacancies | Immigration Matters

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Employers will turn to EU to fill vacancies report shows.

The proportion of employers planning to recruit migrant workers has risen despite the government’s immigration cap, CIPD research has shown.

A quarter (25 per cent) of organisations questioned in the institute’s summer Labour Market Outlook survey say they plan to recruit migrants in the next quarter, up from 22 per cent in the spring survey and the highest proportion on record for the regular research. The finding, which is consistent with ONS data on the number of new arrivals to the UK, comes despite the government’s annual migration cap on non-EU nationals, imposed in April.

A lack of job-specific skills in the UK was cited by six in ten employers as the reason for continuing to look abroad. Worryingly for the government, employers affected by the cap were more likely to say that they are responding by recruiting more EU workers (34 per cent) which are not limited by the cap, rather than by up-skilling their existing workforce (23 per cent).

“We now have a strange anomaly where we have persistently high levels of unemployment but the number of employers reporting recruitment difficulties remains high,” CIPD public policy adviser Gerwyn Davies told PM. “This is because we have an ever more highly skilled economy, with new skilled jobs coming on stream while low skilled jobs are decreasing or being farmed off to China and South Asia. As a result, the supply of highly skilled workers is simply not meeting the demand and we need overseas workers to fill the gap – in areas such as engineering, IT, and even in the public sector where we have a shortage of doctors and nurses and other key positions.”

“There is mixed news for the government here,” continued Davies. “The bad news is that the first resort for employers is simply to look towards the EU, and we’re seeing many employers now looking to the likes of Ireland, Spain, and other countries that have high levels of unemployment to fill some of these roles. However, there is some good news in that a quarter say they will up-skill existing workers – a stated objective of the government – and 18 per cent say they will recruit more graduates. However, another fly in the ointment is that 8 per cent say they are planning to offshore further jobs abroad, which continues to be a real concern for us.”

The research showed that employers are reducing their use of intra-company transfers (ICTs) which were restricted under the cap to workers earning more than £40,000; only 23 per cent of firms plan to use this method in the next quarter. However, the Tier One visa route for highly skilled non-EU workers remains a popular method, with 34 per cent hiring staff through this route.

While the Tier One route for general high-skilled workers has been severely restricted by the government, the Tier One route for post-study workers remains open until 2013, and the real crunch for employers will come when this route is closed down in two years time and other visas are reduced further, Davies added. Source People Management.

Jobs available in the UK despite high unemployment

Despite the government’s best efforts to curb immigration and have more ‘British jobs for British people’, as former PM Gordon Brown put it, employers are still turning to foreign workers to fill jobs which locals are unable or unwilling to do.

Last month David Frost, the director general of the British Chambers of Commerce said that the ‘unemployed lack basic skills and a strong work ethic, encouraging companies to fill vacancies with immigrants’.

UK Immigration figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reveals that the number of foreign born workers with jobs in the UK was 4.08 Million in the three months to June this year, a rise of 278,000 from last year.

Care workers needed

In the health care sector employers are increasingly turning to EU workers from A8 countries and A2 Bulgaria and Romania to fill hundreds of vacancies.

Despite high UK unemployment healthcare support workers or care assistants are still desperately needed by care home employers who cannot fill vacancies locally.

This week I have been contacted by two more care home owners looking for care support workers for homes in Hertfordshire, Eastbourne and Crawley.

One employer said, who has previously employed hundreds of overseas workers on work permits and student visas, said he would prefer candidates from Romania or Bulgaria as they could work full time on Yellow Cards.

Both employers have found it difficult to recruit from within the ‘resident labour market’, which is why in the past few years they have turned to overseas workers on work permits or student visas. But recent changes to Tier 2 and Tier 4 of the points based system, have closed off virtually all routes to recruiting non-EU care workers.

Students renewing their visas with private colleges after 4 July 2011 will no longer be allowed to work at all or sponsor their dependants.

In fact only students (applying or renewing visas after 4 July) who are studying at post graduate level or above at a government university will be allowed to work and sponsor a dependant

Workers from A8 accession countries such as Poland have full ‘free movement of Labour’ rights to work in the UK, however, they are not that keen on care work either and are looking for higher paid work or returning home.

Bulgarians and Romanians who exercise their Treaty Rights (under Article 39) and apply for an accession card as students taking vocational or sandwich courses (e.g. NVQ/QCF in Health and Social Care), are allowed to work full time, as stated on their Yellow Cards.

Some NVQ colleges offer low initial deposits, flexible payments to help students get started and help with job placements (without charge) in the care sector, as well as free support with forms and paperwork.

NVQ and QCF courses have proved popular with Bulgarian and Romanian citizens seeking to gain a UK qualification whilst studying and working in London. 

Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 yellow card registration as students who wish to work are being forced to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance – a form of private medical cover. The insurance is a new requirement introduced by the UK Border Agency as part of changes to the BR1 Yellow Card form in June. The revised BR1 form does not make it clear that a student will need Comprehensive Sickness Insurance, as the actual question relates to those applying as ‘self sufficient’ EU applicants. For more information on immigration rules for Bulgarian and Romanian citizens visit the UK Border Agency website or see an OISC registered immigration adviser. 

See article:

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website 

See article:

 

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website

See also:

Foreign born worker employment soars by 300,000 in second quarter but while UK born workers lose 50,000 jobs

Health care workers needed in UK now

Illegal worker arrested in UKBA raid, but employers still confused by rules for Bulgarian and Romanian workers

BR1 Form for ‘Yellow Card’ Registration revised

Unemployed Brits ‘lack basic skills and work ethic’, say Chamber of Commerce

Immigration Rules for Bulgarian and Romanian nationals 

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

Majestic College offer special packages for EU students. They also have a number of employers looking for staff right now and are willing to employ Bulgarians and Romanians.

For more information call Joanna on 0208 207 1020 or email info@majesticcollege.org 

STILL CONFUSED BY YELLOW CARD RULES?

Free presentations are being run at Bison UK Immigration Advisers for Employers, Romanians and Bulgarians – Monday to Friday, from 11am-12noon and 3-4pm. No need to book, just turn up.

Venue: 16 Shenley Road, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire WD6 1DL. Nearest Train Station: Elstree and Borehamwood Station; Buses from Edgware underground station: 107 and 292.

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  3. […] UK firms plan to recruit more EU migrants to fill job vacancies Foreign born worker employment soars by 300,000 in second quarter but while UK born workers lose 50,000 jobs UK University places filling up faster than last year […]

  4. […] week research by CIPD showed that the proportion of employers planning to recruit migrant workers has risen despite the government’s immigration cap on non-EU […]

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