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There is much confusion surrounding the whole area of Bulgarian and Romanian rights to work and study in the UK.

Migrants, employers and even advisers at Job Centres and help lines are not always clear about whether or not Bulgarian and Romanian nationals can work in the UK and what documents are required.

Despite the fact that they are EU members, when it comes to employment Bulgarian and Romanian citizens do not have the same rights as other Europeans, for instance from Poland, Slovakia or other A8 Accession countries.

Many care industry and catering businesses would like to recruit Romanian, Bulgarian and other European workers, as the Government’s cap on migration, combined with newly imposed restrictions on Tier 2 and Tier 4 routes, has made it increasing difficult to recruit non-EU staff (on work permits and student visas).

But many employers are unaware of the distinct difference between ‘A8’ nationals (Polish, Latvian, Slovakian, Czechs, Hungarians, Slovenians Lithuanians and Estonians), who joined the EU in 2004 and more recent members from Bulgaria and Romania. Although both groups have the same rights to freely enter the UK, they do not enjoy the same rights to work, or free movement of labour. See also: Free Movement of EU nationals explained.

Paragraph 2 of the ‘Guidance for Nationals of Bulgaria and Romania on Obtaining Permission to Work in the United Kingdom’ states:

‘As a Romanian or Bulgarian national you are able to move and live freely in any Member State of the European Union (EU). You do not need permission under our immigration rules to reside legally in the United Kingdom. You will have a right of residence in any EU Member State for the first 3 months of residence on an unrestricted basis and you can remain legally resident in that state as long as you wish, providing you are exercising a Treaty right as a student, a self-employed person, or if you are self-sufficient(and not economically active). You will not have an automatic right to reside as a worker in the United Kingdom (unless you are exempt from work authorisation requirements – see paragraph 6 below).’

Half a million Romanians in UK

There is an estimated 500,000 Romanians alone in the UK, many of whom are working as self employed contractors, which is allowed, whilst others study and work on a yellow coloured registration certificate commonly known as ‘Yellow Card’.

After 12 months of continuous legal work they can apply for residence under a so called ‘Blue Card’ registration.

Working in the UK as a genuine self employed contractor for certain industries, such as IT or the building trade, is fine. But the majority of employers are unwilling to deal with the practicalities of having a whole bunch self employed staff, for instance waiters, chefs or carers, presenting invoices every week.

Finding legitimate employment as a self employed person is proving increasingly difficult for the half a million plus Romanian and Bulgarian citizens already in the UK.

There is also the issue of obtaining a National Insurance (NI) number, which by itself does not infer entitlement to work, as a self employed person.

One self employed Romanian lady told Immigration Matters that she had been refused an NI number five times despite providing all the necessary paperwork to the Glasgow based office.

Study route to Yellow and Blue Cards

Romanian and Bulgarians who study vocational or sandwich-type courses, such as QCF (which replaced NVQ’s this year) in Customer Service, IT, Catering, Hospitality, Construction or Health and Social Care, are allowed to work full time, as stated on the back of their Yellow Cards.

Employers can employ Romanian and Bulgarian workers provided they obtain a yellow card registration certificate allowing them to work in the UK whilst studying for a British qualification.

Provided they stick to the course and work legally for 12 months in line with their course, they will usually be granted a residence ‘Blue Card’ permit.

Some students, perhaps unwilling or unable to pay the fees, drop out of the course as they believe that having obtained a Yellow Card and NI Number they can continue working without further checks.

The Romanian/Bulgarian students and their employers may find themselves in breach of the immigration rules and may therefore lose their eligibility for residence or Blue Card.

As employers can be fined up to £10,000 for each illegal worker they employ, they are now looking deeper into their staff files. 

Employers also have the option of applying for a work permit provided the job meets the requirements.

Bulgarian and Romanian nationals on the UKBA website 

The Home Office or specifically the UK Border Agency’s (UKBA) website contains a substantial amount of information, guidance and rules, which can be overwhelming and confusing to follow at times. 

There is a specific section which explains the restrictions on Bulgarian and Romanian nationals taking employment in the UK. The website states:

‘If you are a Bulgarian or Romanian national, you are free to come and live in the UK. But you must be able to support yourself and your family in the UK without becoming an unreasonable burden on public funds.

‘If you want to work as an employee in the UK, you will need our permission before you start work. Details of the type of work you can take and how to apply for permission to work can be found in the Bulgarian and Romanian nationals section.

‘When you have been working legally as an employee in the UK for 12 months without a break, you will have full rights of free movement and will no longer need our permission to take work. You can then get a registration certificate confirming your right to live and work in the UK, although you are not obliged to do so.’

‘To find out how to apply for a registration certificate, see the Residence documents for European citizens section.’

When you click on the ‘Residence Documents’ link, you are taken to the following page which states: 

‘You do not need our permission to working in a self-employed capacity. However, you can apply for a registration certificate to confirm your right to work as a self-employed person in the UK if you wish.

‘To find out how to apply for a registration certificate, see the Residence documents for European citizens section.

‘If you are a student in the UK, you may take employment for up to 20 hours a week during term time and full-time work during vacation periods from your course, but you must first obtain a registration certificate confirming that you are a student. To find out how to apply for a registration certificate, see the Residence documents for European citizens section.’ 

The UKBA has recently updated information for European Citizens who wish to reside in the UK on their website.

The ‘Residence documents for European citizens’ section of the website states that: 

‘A citizen of the European Economic Area (EEA) or Switzerland may want to apply for ‘confirmation’ that they have the right to live in the UK.

‘If you are an EEA or Swiss national, you can apply for a registration certificate, a document which confirms your right of residence in the UK under European law.

‘If you have ‘lived in the UK for a continuous period of 5 years in accordance with the European regulations, you can apply for a document certifying permanent residence’.

However, it later points out that: 

‘Under European law, you do not need to obtain documentation confirming your right of residence in the UK if you are a national of a country in the EEA.’

It continues:

‘However, if you want to support an application for a residence card by any of your family members who are not EEA nationals, you must demonstrate that you are residing in the UK in accordance with the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 and are ‘exercising Treaty rights’ in the UK. You are said to be exercising Treaty rights if you are:

  • employed or self-employed; or
  • studying; or
  • economically self- sufficient (meaning that you have sufficient funds to support you without requiring public funds); or
  • a jobseeker; or
  • retired; or
  • someone who has had to cease working in the UK owing to permanent incapacity.’

You will see below a section on Eastern European workers which states:

‘If you are a national of a country in Eastern Europe, you may need to be authorised or registered in order to work here. See the European workers section for more information.’

The above link takes you to a further paragraph on ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals’ which states:

‘If you are a Bulgarian or Romanian national, you may need our permission before you can work in the United Kingdom. This section explains who needs to apply for permission, and how to apply’.

A further link takes you to a page which merely states:

‘This section explains how a Bulgarian or Romanian national can live and work in the United Kingdom. It explains:

  • if they have the right to live in the United Kingdom; and
  • if there are any restrictions on them to work in the United Kingdom; and
  • if an employer would need a work permit to employ a Bulgarian or Romanian national; and
  • how to apply for an accession worker card.’

Trawling your way through this section of the UKBA website is hard work to say the least and could be laid out in a more user friendly manner.

TIP – HOW TO FIND APPLICATION FORMS FOR A YELLOW OR BLUE CARD REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE

If you are looking for a particular form or guidance note, try using the UKBA search facility or Google to locate it, rather than work your way through the maze of pages.

For instance, many people ask: ‘where can I find the form to apply for a Yellow Card?’

The form you are looking for is a ‘BR1’, but it is not called a ‘yellow card’ application. In fact a search on the UKBA website for ‘yellow card’ will only give you a ‘No Results found for the Search term ‘yellow card’ reply. So you need to search using the correct name or a more defined search.

The full title of the BR1 form is:

‘APPLICATION FOR A REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE FOR A BULGARIAN OR ROMANIAN NATIONAL EXERCISING A TREATY RIGHT IN THE UNITED KINGDOM’

You can locate the Forms BR1, BR2, BR3, BR4, BR5, BR6, BR7 and ‘http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/applicationforms/bulgariaromania/guidanceforbulgariaromania0408‘ at:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/applicationforms/bulgariaromania/formbr1.pdf

However, if you are reading this article in six months time it may not be at the same location or the immigration Rules may have changed.

As a further restriction, the UK Border Agency has started compelling Bulgarians and Romanians to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover when applying for yellow card registration as a working student. The insurance is a new requirement introduced as part of changes to the BR1 Yellow Card form in June…Full story…

See also: 

Comprehensive Sickness Insurance now required for Bulgarian and Romanian study work yellow cards See article:

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website

Comprehensive Sickness Insurance now required for Bulgarian and Romanian study work yellow cards 

Foreign Doctor and Romanian Nurse row continues 

Hospital bosses defend recruiting Romanian nurses 

Health care workers needed in UK now 

7 tips for completing a Yellow Card BR1 application to work and study in the UK

See article:

 

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

If you need help or advice there is also a UKBA telephone number given for the ‘Accession State customer contact centre’ which is: 0114 207 4074.

You can also seek advice from an Immigration Adviser, but make sure they are registered with the OISC, which provides a list of qualified advisers all over the UK.

See also:

HOW TO FIND APPLICATION FORMS FOR A ‘YELLOW’ OR ‘BLUE’ CARD REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE ON THE UK BORDER AGENCY WEBSITE

Free Movement of EU nationals explained

Worker Registration Scheme to close 

7 tips for completing a Yellow Card BR1 application to work and study in the UK

Employers ‘addicted’ to migrant workers says UK Immigration Minister

STILL CONFUSED? Majestic College offer special packages for EU students. They also have a number of employers looking for staff right now and are willing to employ Bulgarians and Romanians.

For more information call Joanna on 0208 207 1020 or email info@majesticcollege.org

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267 Responses to “Immigration Rules for Bulgarian and Romanian nationals”
Read them below or add one

  1. aleksandrina14@gmail.com' aleksandrina14@gmail.com'Alex says:

    Hello I am Bulgarian I want know if I have yellow card do I need NI?

  2. The UKBA say they can take up to six months.

  3. dorinailciuc@yahoo.com' dorinailciuc@yahoo.com'Dorina says:

    Hi,my name is Dorina, I’m from Romania and (my husband is here for more than 5 ys)we applied for yellow and blue card. It’s pass already 4 months from our letter and we haven’t receive any answer. Many of my friends receive it in no longer then 3 month’s. What is the longest waiting time?
    Many thanks

  4. pituleac_lucian@yahoo.com' pituleac_lucian@yahoo.com'Lucian Pituleac says:

    I am a Romanian came to UK a year ago. I would like to apply for a yellow card as a student. Can you please advice me if I have to be in fulltime education to apply for a yellow card? Also how long will have to be a UK resident to apply?

    I look forward to hear from your team

    Many Thanks

    Regards

    Lucian Pituleac

  5. pavlinadobreva@yahoo.com' pavlinadobreva@yahoo.com'Pavlina Dobreva says:

    Hi, I am Bulgarian student in UK, a fiend of mine is staying with me at the moment but he is going to reach his third mount in the country in a week time. How long it will take before he will have the right to come back in UK as a tourist?

  6. music4us90210@yahoo.com' music4us90210@yahoo.com'Elena Lazarescu says:

    Hello. I am Elena from Romania. I’ve been working as a self employed cleaner for over 12 months now. I am quite confused as I heard different opinions My question is if I can apply for a Blue Registration after 12 months of self-employment. And If I can what form should I fill in. Many Thanks.

  7. Where is the interview?

  8. mortishia_criss@yahoo.com' mortishia_criss@yahoo.com'cristina says:

    hi,im cristina, Romania …i get married 8 months ago,my husband is from Pakistan and in few weeks we have to go for interview .. do anyone knows what type of question they gona ask ? thank you

  9. tony48@yahoo.com' tony48@yahoo.com'T.M. says:

    Hello,

    I’m Bulgarian and I would like to know what can I work as self-employed? Can I work as waiter, chef, chef assistent or carer?

    Thank you for all the information you give us at your web site.

  10. mmam1412@hotmail.com' mmam1412@hotmail.com'memo says:

    hi I want to know what is the difference between writing for job and study in UK

  11. You need to apply through an agency or Licensed Gangmaster company

  12. lascaian_ovi@yahoo.com' lascaian_ovi@yahoo.com'lascaian ovidiu says:

    Hello
    My name is Ovidiu Lascaian residing in Cluj-Napoca, Romania and I want to know how to do to work on a farm in England?
    Thank you!

  13. monik_2008_32@yahoo.com' monik_2008_32@yahoo.com'Monica Chirica says:

    I want to know which documents should be for resident applications.Regards,Monica

  14. laura_rumpel@yahoo.co.uk' laura_rumpel@yahoo.co.uk'Laura says:

    Many of us have finished now the 5 years residency requirements for permanent residency. But I cannot find anywhere the application form we need to fill in, as a Romanian national.

    Can you please help us and say which form should be used? Permanent resident card or Indefinite Leave to Remain?…

  15. istratebianca23@yahoo.com' istratebianca23@yahoo.com'bianca says:

    hello! I had myself a question: How can I can I get the blue card if I book yellow

  16. Good luck with your yellow card!

    See article:

    UK Border Agency launch new website
    The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.
    For instance, the link for European Workers is now:
    http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/
    The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals’ is:
    http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/
    The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.
    The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.
    Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover.
    The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:
    ‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’
    In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.
    Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.
    What is the correct insurance cover?
    One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.
    Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.
    To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website.

  17. petro25nice@yahoo.com' petro25nice@yahoo.com'Petronela says:

    Hi.My name is Petronela and I want to thank you for information provided.As I saw the UKBA is mostly confusing us then helping.I am trying for a year to get my yellow card and no chance yet. My husband came here after me and he’s got it.It’s up to them.No luck,still trying!!

  18. Roniduicu@yahoo.com' Roniduicu@yahoo.com'Ioan says:

    Hello,
    I have work out the maze myself. After 9 month and a tribunal decision i got my yellow card. I was convince that now i will get the nino first go, did try before 3 times getting the same response: you did not prove that you have not proven the right to work in the UK. so with my new yellow card all my selfemployement documents, invoices, customer letters, expenses, accountant letter, any many more… About 300 pages of prof, surprize the job center replay to my. We will not realse on this occasion a nino, now the funny part the reason: search for help and advice. After a visit at the public bureau where they have been in shock of the amount of documents and proofs that i had i was again at the job center, the 9th time. The person that interview my ask my way I do not go back to my country and save the time. By the way he was an emmigrant as well. I replay that is not his business and promis that if this ttime i am not getting what is my by right i will take them to The Court of human rights, as by preventing my from getting the nino i can benefit from eney protecion, basicly if i get sick then i will have to pay hundreds on privet doctors as those from nhs do not want to deal with me.
    Buttom line the conffusion is great nobody knows nothing, and amazing those that do get ebery thing solved are the bad guys that are just after benefitis…
    Life is taff but do not give up

  19. draculya20@yahoo.com' draculya20@yahoo.com'Cristina says:

    HI! I am from Romania and I applied for an Agricultural course and I am also working in a farm, the farm will help me apply for an yellow card. the course is held 7 months; even if Concordia told me I can stay here up to 11 months, the work on the farm finishes at the end of november and there’s nothing I can work here, so it will be only 7 months and then go home. I realy want to apply for a blue card? what can I do after the 7 months? find another work to cumulate 12 months? or if I change work place will be automatically interrupted? or after I get my diploma i can find a job for a 12 months period?

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