New UK Immigration application forms – 6 April 2013

The UK Border Agency (UKBA) has published new versions of the following application forms, as well as new immigration forms, for use on or after 6 April 2013:

  • FLR (BUS) – further leave to remain (overseas business representative or retired person of independent means)
  • FLR(M) – further leave to remain (marriage)
  • FLR(O) – further leave to remain (other)
  • FLR(P) – further leave to remain (child under 18 of relative with leave as refugee or under humanitarian protection)
  • FLRTier1 (HSMP) – further leave to remain (Highly Skilled Migrant Programme)
  • SET(BUS) – settlement (overseas business representative or retired person of independent means)
  • SET(DV) – settlement (victims of domestic violence)
  • SET(F) – settlement (children of British citizens or people settled in the UK)
  • SET(M) – settlement (marriage)
  • SET(O) – settlement (other)
  • BRP(RC) – biometric residence permit (RC)
  • NTL – no time limit
  • TOC – transfer of conditions
  • TD112 – travel document
  • Tier 1, 2 or 5 (Dependant)
  • Tier 4 (Dependant)
  • Tier 1 (Entrepreneur)
  • Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent)
  • VAF 9: Annex ET – :Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent)
  • Tier 1 (General)
  • Tier 1 (Investor)
  • Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur)
  • Tier 2
  • Tier 2 (Worker) (Dependant)
  • Tier 4 (Cchild student)
  • Tier 4 (General)
  • Tier 5 (Temporary Worker)
  • Super premium service form
  • Highly Trusted Sponsor form
  • Fee Payment Arrangements for premium applications for leave to remain in Cardiff, Glasgow and Solihull public enquiry offices (PBS dependants only)
  • Fee Payment Arrangements for premium applications for leave to remain In Cardiff, Glasgow And Solihull public enquiry offices (Except PBS dependants)

New UK Immigration Forms forms:

  • Tier1(Exceptional Talent) (Endorsement)
  • SET (LR) form – settlement (long residence)
  • FLR(LR) – further leave to remain (long residence)
  • VAF 9: Appendix 4 – (Graduate Entrepreneur)

You should use the new application forms from 6 April 2013, but you can apply on the previous versions of a form up to and including 27 April 2013.

If you submit an application on or after 6 April 2013, the UKBA will consider it under the revised Immigration Rules which take effect on 6 April, regardless of which version of a form you use.

Applications submitted on or after 6 April must be accompanied by the new fee. Applications submitted with the incorrect fee will not be accepted.

If you have been arrested or detained, need any immigration advice or are worried about the new immigration rules or need help with Sponsorship or Tier 1, 2, Tier 4, applying for university if your college has closed, Spouse Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, Dependant Visa or an appeal against a refusal, or if you have been waiting for a reply from the Home Office for longer than a year, please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk for free immigration news updates.

Related immigration blogs:

Higher Immigration Fees from 6 April 2013

UK Immigration Rules Relaxed for International Students

‘Not fit for purpose’ UK Border Agency to be scrapped, but same people doing same jobs for the same bosses

Life in the UK Test Update

Deputy Prime Minister Abandons Amnesty Policy and now wants Immigration Bonds for ‘high risk’ Migrants

New Questions on BR1 Form could trip up overstaying Romanians and Bulgarians applying for Yellow Cards

Work restrictions on migrant workers from Romania ‘leads them to stay longer in UK and bring families’, survey reveals

79% want to ban EU migrants from UK, poll suggests

Romanian and Bulgarian immigration – UK Government strategy ‘farcical’, MP says

MP calls for variation of free movement treaty and limits on EU Immigration from Romania and Bulgaria

EEA National’s right of residence in the UK

Romanian and Bulgarian influx will cause housing shortage

UK to impose work restrictions on Croatians when they join EU on 1 July 2013

Keep out EU benefit tourists says UK Prime Minister

Government has ‘no idea’ how many Romanians and Bulgarians will migrate to UK

Majestic College offer special packages for EU students. They also have a number of employers looking for staff right now and are willing to employ Bulgarians and Romanians.

For more information call Joanna on 0208 207 or email: info@majesticcollege.org

Highly Trusted provider Spinnaker College are holding OPEN DAYS at their London study centre on the 8th and 9th April. In country Tier 4 and EU students, such as Romanians and Bulgarians, as well as those with issue with their previous college are welcome.

Qualified legal advisers will be on hand for free immigration consultations to in-country students affected by the closure of their college.

To register for this FREE event, email: london@spinnakercollege.com or call 0795 747 0180 to speak to a student adviser.


Changes to employing private servants or Domestic Workers in diplomatic households

The UK Border Agency has announced important changes, effective 6 April 2012, to the procedure for sponsoring a private servant (e.g. domestic worker) in a diplomatic household under Tier 5 of the points-based system.

These private servants will continue to be able to come to the UK under Tier 5 (Temporary worker – International agreement), and will still need to be sponsored by the diplomatic mission. But the mission will need to add a ‘sponsor note’ to the certificate of sponsorship assigned to a private servant, giving the name of the diplomat for whom the private servant will work.

The private servant will only be able to work for this diplomat. They will not be able to change to work for another diplomat in the mission, and must leave the UK when the diplomat does (or earlier). The private servant will be able to stay for a maximum of 5 years.

The UK Government is also introducing a pre-entry requirement:

the private servant and the diplomat for whom they will work must agree and sign written terms and conditions of employment (covering issues such as hours of work, salary and time off).

This document must be completed before the private servant can be sponsored, and must be included with their visa application. As the sponsor, the mission will agree that the private servant’s written terms and conditions conform to all relevant UK and European legislation, such as the National Minimum Wage Act and the EU working time directive.

These changes do not affect private servants who are exempt from immigration control because they are servants of the head of a diplomatic mission employed and paid directly by the diplomat’s own country. Source: UK Border Agency.

The ‘domestic worker in a private household’ scheme allows overseas employers to bring their domestic workers with them when they visit or move to the UK. To come here as a domestic worker, you must be an established member of your employer’s staff.

Domestic workers may include cleaners, chauffeurs, gardeners, cooks, those providing personal care for the employer or a member of the employer’s family, and nannies if they are providing a personal service relating to the running of the employer’s household.

You will be given a visa to stay in the UK for a fixed period of time. At the end of this period, you must return home or apply to extend your stay.

Thousands of Filipino workers are employed as Domestic Workers, many of whom came to the UK with an employer and were allowed to switch to another employer as part of the Domestic Workers Concession set up under the Blair government.

This week the UK Border Agency also announced that from 29 February, the application form, FLR(BID) – further leave to remain - will no longer be available.

See also:

FLR(BID) form withdrawn from 29 February 2012

Cap on skilled worker permits to remain unchanged Migration Advisory Committee recommends

Three times more Intra-Company migrants coming to UK than skilled worker Tier 2 visas

EU and non-EU workers take more UK jobs as number of Britons in work plunges

UK’s Tier 2 immigration rules could see EU chefs cooking your Indian curry 

Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email:  info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk


FLR(BID) form withdrawn from 29 February 2012

From 29 February, the application form, FLR(BID) – further leave to remain - will no longer be available, the UK Border Agency has announced.

This will affect those applying as:

  • an academic visitor;
  • domestic worker in a private household;
  • UK ancestor;
  • visitor for private medical care; and
  • a dependent of a person with limited leave.

Applicants applying in these categories should use form FLR(O) from 29 February. From 29 February appointments at public enquiry offices for these case types, should be booked under the FLR(O) category.

Applicants wishing to reschedule their appointment for 29 February onwards, using the online booking facility are required to cancel their FLR(BID) appointment and then rebook an appointment in the FLR(O) category.

The FLR(O) guidance can be found on the application forms page. Source: UK Border Agency. 

See also:

Cap on skilled worker permits to remain unchanged Migration Advisory Committee recommends

Three times more Intra-Company migrants coming to UK than skilled worker Tier 2 visas

EU and non-EU workers take more UK jobs as number of Britons in work plunges

UK’s Tier 2 immigration rules could see EU chefs cooking your Indian curry 

Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email:  info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

Posted on Mar 1, 2012 - Last updated on Feb 29, 2012

UKBA online system for UK immigration applications unavailable this weekend

The UK Border Agency (UKBA) has announced that the ‘Apply online’ system for applicants in the UK will be unavailable this weekend from 5pm on Friday 5 August, while we carry out essential maintenance. 

This will affect applicants using the following interactive application forms: 

FLR(O), FLR(M), SET(O), SET(M), NTL, EM, B(OS), B(OTA), ROA, RS1, RS2, T, UKM 

The service will be available again from the morning of Monday 8 August.

See article:

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website 

See article:

 

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

CONFUSED BY YELLOW CARD RULES?

Free presentations are being run at Bison UK Immigration Advisers for Employers, Romanians and Bulgarians – Monday to Friday, from 11am-12noon and 3-4pm. No need to book, just turn up.

Venue: 16 Shenley Road, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire WD6 1DL. Nearest Train Station: Elstree and Borehamwood Station; Buses from Edgware underground station: 107 and 292.


David Cameron says UKBA will appeal against Blackburn death crash driver ruling

Prime Minister David Cameron has made a public statement saying that the UK Border Agency (UKBA) will appeal against a ruling preventing the deportation of an asylum-seeker who left a girl dying under a car.

Immigration Minister Damian Green made the announcement hours after the prime minister expressed anger at the case.

Iraqi Kurd Aso Mohammed Ibrahim was jailed for four months after knocking down Amy Houston in Blackburn in 2003.

On Thursday, the 33-year-old was told he could remain in the UK as he had fathered children there.

Her father Paul Houston, from Darwen, told judges last month they had the power to bring his “seven years of hell to an end” by sending Ibrahim to Iraq.

But two senior immigration judges have now ruled he can remain in the UK

“Where are my human rights?” Paul Houston, victim’s father

The Upper Tribunal of the Immigration and Asylum Chamber, sitting in Manchester, heard Ibrahim had previous criminal convictions.

The 33-year-old, who did not hold a driving licence, was jailed for four months for driving while disqualified and failing to stop after an accident.

On his release he met a British woman and they had two children, Harry, four, and Zara, three.

He was due to be deported but won the right to stay in the UK in December 2009 after arguing that, because he now had two children since being freed from prison, he had a right to a family life under human rights law.

Two senior immigration judges have now rejected a final appeal by the UK Border Agency to have him deported.

Mr Houston said: “What are the judges saying here? They are saying it doesn’t matter what you do when you come here, who you kill, what laws you break, as long as you have a child here you can stay?

“You work hard, play by the rules, pay your taxes and this is how you get treated. What does that say about politicians, our leaders and the legal system? It’s a joke.”

He added: “This man is a criminal, do we have no say who we allow in this country?

“He’s not a life-saving surgeon or a Nobel prize winner. He was a criminal before, a criminal now and he will continue being a criminal.

“The Human Rights Act is for everybody, not just asylum-seekers and terrorists.

“How can he say he’s deprived of his right to a family life? The only person deprived of a family life is me. Amy was my only family.”

“They are obsessed with the rights of others from Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iraq. Where are my human rights?”

Source: BBC Click Here to See BBC video report.

Normally migrant workers and students seeking extensions or leave to remain would be refused even if they had committed a minor offence.

Immigration forms such as FLRO forms ask applicants questions such as:

Do you or any dependants who are applying with you have any criminal convictions in the UK or any other country (including traffic offences) or any civil judgments made against you?

Even if you have answered ‘No’ to the above question you must answer the following questions:

Have you or any dependants who are applying with you ever been charged in any country with a criminal offence for which you have not yet been tried in court?

In times of either peace or war have you or any dependants who are applying with you ever been involved, or suspected of involvement, in war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide?

Have you or any dependants who are applying with you ever been involved in, supported or encouraged terrorist activities in any country?

Have you or any dependants who are applying with you ever been a member of, or given support to, an organisation which has been concerned in terrorism?

Have you or any dependants who are applying with you ever, by any means or medium, expressed views that justify or glorify terrorist violence or that may encourage others to terrorist acts or other serious criminal acts?

Have you or any dependants who are applying with you ever engaged in any other activities which might indicate that you may not be considered to be per­sons of good character?

Potentially even a minor civil or criminal offence or County Court Judgment (CCJ) for an unpaid student or credit card debt could affect your application to extend your visa or remain permanently in the UK (Indefinite Leave to Remain).

In this case, however, lawyers have successfully argued deporting Ibrahim would deprive him of his ‘right to a family life’ under the Human Rights Act.

See also:

Immigration Cap ruled illegal

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk


New FLR Forms for Further Leave to Remain Applications

New FLO(O) forms, to be used after 27 November 2008, have been published by Uk Border Agency this week.

 

If you are making an application for Further Leave to Remain on or after 27 November 2008, you must use the new version (11/2008) of the FLR(O) form.

 

Full details and guidance on completing application form FLR(O) to extend your permission to stay (leave to remain) in the United Kingdom can be found on the UK Border Agency websiteFLR(O) forms are used to extend leave to remain for the following:

 

 

  • visitor (applying for permission to extend stay for up to a total of six months)
  • visitor undergoing private medical treatment
  • postgraduate doctor or dentist
  • au pair
  • representative of an overseas newspaper, news agency or broadcasting organisation
  • private servant in a diplomatic household
  • domestic worker in a private household
  • overseas government employee
  • minister of religion, missionary, or member of a religious order
  • visiting religious worker or religious worker in a non-pastoral role
  • airport-based operational staff of an overseas-owned airline
  • person with United Kingdom ancestry
  • writer, composer or artist
  • overseas qualified nurse or midwife
  • dependant of member of HM Forces who is exempt from immigration control

You should also read the FLR(O) guidance notes before applying or take legal advice from a registered Immigration Adviser with specialist knowledge of the rules on leave to remain, visas or Work Permits before applying, as the Home Office will not refund your fee if they refuse your application or you withdraw it. Mistakes can be costly and could lead to losing your status in the UK.

 

For the latest immigration news visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

If you need immigration advice or help with Leave to Remain, Visa or an appeal against a refusal please email us at: info@immigrationmatters.co.uk


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