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Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 | Immigration Matters

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UK work restrictions on Bulgarian and Romanian nationals, who are members of the European Union, will be extended until the end of 2013, Immigration Minister Damian Green announced today.

Romanian and Bulgarian (EU2) nationals seeking to work in the UK will still need permission from the UK Border Agency before they can work in the UK.

The Immigration Minister said:

‘Maintaining these controls will make sure migration benefits the UK and does not adversely impact on our labour market. The government is radically reforming the immigration system, and has already announced an annual limit on work visas and tough new rules for students to ensure net migration is reduced from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of thousands.

‘The Migration Advisory Committee has made a clear case for extending the existing restrictions on Bulgarians and Romanians. This government has also made clear that we will always introduce transitional controls on all new EU member states as a matter of course.’

The decision is in line the government’s policy to ‘reduce employers’ dependence on migrant workers, particularly for lower skilled jobs and help the unemployed to find their way back into work’.

A report from the independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) looked at the impact on the domestic labour market if the transitional controls were removed. It found that lifting the current restrictions could cause more EU2 nationals to come to the UK to work, particularly in lower skilled occupations where there is greater risk of displacement of resident workers and a negative impact on wages.

Permission to work will normally be given only where the worker has a specific job offer and the work is in skilled employment for which the employer has been unable to find a suitably qualified resident worker. There are also quota-based arrangements for lower skilled jobs in the agricultural and food processing sectors which will stay at the same level for 2012 and 2013.

The agency added that the extension of the restrictions does not affect the position of those who have already been authorised to take employment in the UK.

The Migration Advisory Committee’s report into EU2 (Bulgarian and Romanian) nationals was published on 4 November 2011 and can be found on the UKBA website. Source: UK Border Agency.
The news will come as a disappointment to the thousands of Bulgarian and Romanian citizens who are hoping to work in the UK.

Although the public will largely support the government’s moves to restrict immigration, certain sectors are still struggling to find staff.

Care homes are facing a staffing crisis following a government clampdown on non-EU immigration and changes to Tier 2 work visa rules.

Employers looking for staff, like those in the care industry, are increasingly turning to EU member workers from Eastern Europe.

However, not all EU members have the same rights to work in the UK and getting it wrong could result in a hefty fine for the employer.

Employers are often unaware of the distinct difference between ‘A8’ nationals (Polish, Latvian, Slovakian, Czechs, Hungarians, Slovenians Lithuanians and Estonians), who joined the EU in 2004 and more recent members from Bulgaria and Romania. Although both groups have the same rights to freely enter the UK, they do not enjoy the same rights to work, or free movement of labour.

Even though they are EU members, when it comes to employment Bulgarian and Romanian citizens do not have the same rights as other Europeans, for instance from Poland, Slovakia or other A8 Accession countries. See: Free Movement of EU nationals explained.

Bulgarians and Romanians coming to the UK on Yellow Card registration permits can work and study full time on vocational courses such as NVQ or QCF courses in Health and Social Care

See also:

EU and non-EU workers take more UK jobs as number of Britons in work plunges

Health care workers needed in UK now

Agency workers receive pay and conditions boost

HOW TO FIND APPLICATION FORMS FOR A ‘YELLOW’ OR ‘BLUE’ CARD REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE ON THE UK BORDER AGENCY WEBSITE

Free Movement of EU nationals explained

Immigration Rules for Bulgarian and Romanian nationals

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

Majestic College offer special packages for EU students. They also have a number of employers looking for staff right now and are willing to employ Bulgarians and Romanians.

For more information call Joanna on 0208 207 1020 or email info@majesticcollege.org

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117 Responses to “Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013”
Read them below or add one

  1. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  2. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  3. Sylvia Cherrie says :

    They are most professional at aggression, arrogance, greed and impatience. They are not so skilled in courtesy, deference, etiquette, good manners and politeness. When they say that we are lazy, tell them that we did not say that they have to work sixty hours a week. Do not tell us why they have to come here in the first place unless you tell us the complete truth as to why they cannot get a decent job in their own country.

  4. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  5. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  6. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  7. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  8. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  9. […] working here (and have obtained permission to work if this is required – for instance if your are Bulgarian or Romanian); […]

  10. […] working here (and have obtained permission to work if this is required – for instance if your are Bulgarian or Romanian); […]

  11. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  12. […] Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013 […]

  13. Greetings to everyone.
    I am a Romanian who works and lives in Romania, I have no interest in leaving my country, and I do not care for a few extra mony, I have everything I need.
    After 1990 Romania was attacked by the westen contryes including the UK and economically destroyed. Unfortunately after this attack Romania was conquered and its citizens were turned into slaves who must pay for the right to stay alive. All this happened without a declaration of war as in the case of Serbia. Of course in the European Community some citizens are more equal than others, conquered countries and citizens can not have the same rights.
    In Romania we are 21000000 total inhabitants probably vast majority like me actually don’t want to emigrate, and the effect of those willing to do so is insignificant on the economies and labor market of EU countries including the UK. I don’t think a lower salary influences the employer’s decidision in hiring someone; further losses can be much higher. By restricting the right to work of course crime increases, people generally need to secure their basic needs and will do anything for it.
    In conclusion what to think about the great democracy of the European family, I’m sure I was treated with more respect by the Soviets in the past.

  14. […] working here (and have obtained permission to work if this is required – for instance if your are Bulgarian or Romanian); […]

  15. […] of thousands of Romanians and Bulgarians are already working in the UK, despite work restrictions forcing them to register as self-employed or study, wait six moths for a yellow card and pay for […]

  16. Peter, with regards to your comment on care home wages.
    Some care homes do pay higher rates where their clients are private and pay commercial rates, but if the client is funded by the local authority the weekly bed rate is much lower. The care home income in most cases is set by the local authority so they cannot just push up the staff salaries which make up 60% of their costs. Even those homes which pay above the minimum rate still struggle to find British workers, many of whom are better off on benefits so have no incentive to work.
    Foreign staff are not employed because employers want to pay slave wages. They are employed because they are prepared to WORK and put in the unsocial hours. Work means not just turning up for a shift.
    Unfortunately for this country, there is a section of the population who are just plain lazy and in some cases useless. Foreign workers run rings around them, so who will the employer choose?
    Most EU citizens have a right to work here so can compete on equal terms.

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