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Health care workers needed in UK now – Bulgarian and Romanian citizens wanted by employers | Immigration Matters

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Despite high UK unemployment healthcare support workers or care assistants are still desperately needed by employers who cannot fill vacancies locally.

With millions of British people unemployed and the country’s economy in the doldrums, in theory the care industry should have no problems in finding care or support workers for the 20,000 plus homes. 

That’s the theory, but in practice care home employers are still desperate for staff, especially outside the main cities. 

A search on one Government Job Centre Plus website, Job Seekers Direct Find a Job Now, revealed 344 job vacancies within a 75 mile radius of central London region alone. 

Some employers are offering as much as £10.50 per hour, £4.57 above the national minimum wage, for a Health Care Assistant for a dementia care unit in London. 

Most, however, offered pay rates of between £6.00 and £7.50 per hour and many state in their advertisements ‘previous experience not essential as full training will be given’. 

So why are employers still struggling to recruit staff? The are a number of factors. 

Care work is not ‘sexy’ 

Care work is not a glamorous, sexy or highly paid job. The long shifts, including nights and weekends, are filled with hard, challenging, work with a high degree of personal responsibility. 

The current state unemployment benefit system also means that many are actually better off staying at home on benefits than taking a minimum wage job.

Employers have found it difficult to recruit from within the ‘resident labour market’, which is why in the past few years they have turned to overseas workers on work permits or student visas. This brings us to the second factor. 

Changes in to Immigration Rules and Immigration Cap

Recent changes in legislations, including Tier 2, Tier 4 and the cap on immigration, have closed off virtually all routes to recruiting non-EU care workers. For instance: 

  • Senior Care Workers are no longer on the official shortage occupations list.
  • Tier 2 changes restricts work permits to management level jobs
  • Tier 4 student visa changes are squeezing many students out of the job market
  • Tier 4 changes on dependant visas will abolish another source of labour

Care homes find it increasingly difficult to employ Tier 4 students when many are only allowed 10 hours work per week.

And students renewing their visas with private colleges after 4 July 2011 will no longer be allowed to work at all or sponsor their dependants.

In fact only students (applying or renewing visas after 4 July) who are studying at post graduate level or above at a government university will be allowed to work and sponsor a dependant

European workers 

Workers from A8 accession countries such as Poland have full ‘free movement of Labour’ rights to work in the UK, however, many care home owners say that they are not that keen on care work either and are looking for higher paid work.

As the newest members of the European Union, Bulgarians and Romanians also have ‘visa-free’ access to enter the UK, however, they do not enjoy the same rights to work as the earlier ‘A8’ Eastern European EU accession countries.

Romanian and Bulgarian citizens who exercise their Treaty Rights (under Article 39) and apply for an accession card as students taking vocational or sandwich courses (e.g. NVQ/QCF in Health and Social Care), are allowed to work full time, as stated on their Yellow Cards.

Applying for a BR1 Accession Registration or Yellow Card can take over 4 weeks. The process has changed in June when a new BR1 Form and guidance was introduced adding requirements such as an Oath to stating that the student will not become a burden to state.

The requirement that the student must have a confirmed job offer before the UK Border Agency will issue a student Yellow Card does not help matters. Trying to explain to an employer that they have to offer a job to someone who is not yet allowed to work but will be in about 4 weeks time is not easy.

UK jobs are available in the care industry 

The bottom line is that there are jobs out there for those who want to work. 

One employer, who owns a chain of care homes and sheltered housing units for people with learning disabilities, said that he would ‘like to employ more Romanians and Bulgarians if he can find those with Yellow Cards (as students) who don’t mind working outside of London’. 

He went on to say that he simply cannot find enough staff locally who are ‘prepared to put up with the hours, shifts and responsibility associated with caring for people with learning disabilities and in some cases challenging behaviour’. 

Another issue for all employers is the amount ‘red tape’ or bureaucracy they are expected to cope with. Before employing a care worker a care home has to apply for a CRB (criminal records check) and put the worker through an induction course, all of which costs money and takes several weeks. 

If the worker leaves after say three months it has cost the employer around £2000 in training and management time. 

Bulgarians and Romanians need a period of 12 months work in order to qualify for a Blue Card or permanent residency, which means they are far more likely to stay after being trained.

The challenge for Bulgarians and Romanians coming to the UK is getting through that initial period when they cannot work and have no money coming in to pay their rent and food.

The Yellow Card process takes at least 3 to 4 weeks and students must be enrolled on the course before applying to the UK Border Agency, which means paying a college to register them.

Some colleges, such as Majestic College in Borehamwood, offer low initial deposits and flexible payments to help students get started. They also offer help with job placements (without charge) in the care sector and free support with forms and paperwork.

NVQ and QCF courses have proved popular with Bulgarian and Romanian citizens seeking to gain a UK qualification whilst studying and working in London. 

Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 yellow card registration as students who wish to work are being forced to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance – a form of private medical cover. The insurance is a new requirement introduced by the UK Border Agency as part of changes to the BR1 Yellow Card form in June. The revised BR1 form does not make it clear that a student will need Comprehensive Sickness Insurance, as the actual question relates to those applying as ‘self sufficient’ EU applicants.For more information on immigration rules for Bulgarian and Romanian citizens visit the UK Border Agency website or see an OISC registered immigration adviser. 

See article:

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website 

See article:

 

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website

See also:

Comprehensive Sickness Insurance now required for Bulgarian and Romanian study work yellow cards

Immigration Rules for Bulgarian and Romanian nationals 

Free Movement of EU nationals explained

HOW TO FIND APPLICATION FORMS FOR A ‘YELLOW’ OR ‘BLUE’ CARD REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE ON THE UK BORDER AGENCY WEBSITE

Colleges and Universities discount fees to attract more Tier 4 students

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

Majestic College offer special packages for EU students. They also have a number of employers looking for staff right now and are willing to employ Bulgarians and Romanians.

For more information call Joanna on 0208 207 1020 or email info@majesticcollege.org 

STILL CONFUSED BY YELLOW CARD RULES?

Free presentations are being run at Bison UK Immigration Advisers for Employers, Romanians and Bulgarians – Monday to Friday, from 11am-12noon and 3-4pm. No need to book, just turn up.

Venue: 16 Shenley Road, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire WD6 1DL. Nearest Train Station: Elstree and Borehamwood Station; Buses from Edgware underground station: 107 and 292.

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79 Responses to “Health care workers needed in UK now – Bulgarian and Romanian citizens wanted by employers”
Read them below or add one

  1. I am a male-nurse. I want a job urgently. My country Nigeria are ful with unemployment. Pls i dont have any job. And i suffering hunger want kill me. I want to work outside dis country. No job here i eat 1 in a day bcos no money. I want to work as healthworker at any european countrise. Pls help me i a can see any dat we help me out of dis countrise. I promise i we pay u back when ever i start work. Bcos i am broke i don’t have money for fliet come over dere if u said i should come.

  2. No. Not as things stand

  3. Nathan says :

    Hi. I have a question for you. I am a 29yo young man, romanian. I have a University degree in Social Work, finished in Romania. I have experience in many aspects of care outside UK. Here I have the UTR number, so I can work like Self Employed. But I dont have a Yellow or Blue Card. So, what I want to know… I have the right to work legally like normal employee in social care in UK or not (in a care home, for example)? Thank you in advance for you answer!

  4. andreea carausu says :

    Hello.I have just finished the nurse school in Romania,I am qualified but with no experience.I am 27 and I came in UK 3 months ago.I would like to work as nurse in London but I have no idea where to look and ask for a job in healthcare.I can do volunteer work if is necessary.Please can you advise me with something? Thank you!

  5. […] still needs workers to fill vacancies in certain job sectors, such as the care industry where healthcare workers are needed now, especially in London and the South East of […]

  6. […] for staff in the catering sector and care industry, are increasingly turning to EU workers from Central and Eastern […]

  7. […] for staff in the care industry, are increasingly turning to EU workers from Central and Eastern […]

  8. […] for staff, like those in the care industry, are increasingly turning to EU workers from Central and Eastern […]

  9. […] for staff, like those in the care industry, are increasingly turning to EU member workers from Eastern Europe – because they cannot […]

  10. The government has changed Tier 2 rules and imposed a cap on immigration last year. You will only be able to obtain a tier 2 visa for a management level job.

  11. karamjeet kaur says :

    hi i did diploma in health and social care from london and i have experiance for work in care sector more then 13th months , i am looking for sponsership for visa and job in care , please let me know if you have any . thanx

  12. […] high UK unemployment healthcare support workers or care assistants are still desperately needed by employers who cannot fill vacancies […]

  13. […] for staff, for instance in the care industry, are increasingly turning to EU member workers from Eastern […]

  14. […] worthwhile in the long run. There are jobs in the UK for those prepared to work especially in the care sector and catering and hospitality industry which already employs thousands of Bulgarian and Romanian […]

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