Notice: wp_enqueue_script was called incorrectly. Scripts and styles should not be registered or enqueued until the wp_enqueue_scripts, admin_enqueue_scripts, or login_enqueue_scripts hooks. Please see Debugging in WordPress for more information. (This message was added in version 3.3.0.) in /home/immigration/public_html/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4138
British MPs voice ‘profound concern’ over Home Office plans to bar foreign students | Immigration Matters

Want to learn more about UK/EU Immigration Law? Click Act Now to learn more... Act Now

Hide
Show
Call Us +44 7950 458 464 | info@immigrationmatters.co.uk
 Categories : News

 

Members of the UK Parliament express alarm as the Home Secretary announces plans to close the door on up to 120,000 international students from outside the EU, the Guardian reports

A cross-party group of MPs, including Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, are to voice their “profound concerns” to the UK Home Secretary, Theresa May, over her plans to bar tens of thousands of overseas students from outside the European Union coming to study in Britain.

The plans outlined this week include restricting overseas student visas to those on degree-level courses and are expected to lead to the closure of some English-language schools and other privately-run colleges.

The package means that the government will close the door on up to 120,000 international students from outside the EU who come to Britain to take “below-degree” level courses – about 40% of the annual total.

The Home Office student visa consultation paper being published today forms a key part of the Conservatives’ drive to reduce overall net migration from 215,000 in 2009 to “tens of thousands” by the time of the next general election.

MPs representing traditional English-language school centres such as Brighton, Eastbourne and Malvern have joined those from more recent centres such as Sheffield in voicing their “profound concerns” to the home secretary over the moves.

It has been estimated that overseas students contribute £100m annually to the local economy in Brighton alone.

Tony Milns of English UK, which represents 440 English-language colleges or schools, warned that some were likely to close: “A lot of MPs with language colleges or schools in their constituencies are concerned. They realise the economic and other benefits to their constituents of having foreign students spending money.”

The publication of this week’s consultation paper was postponed a fortnight ago after a government Minister, the Business Secretary Vince Cable, was inadvertently photographed holding a briefing paper warning against making the UK less attractive to overseas students.

Ministers say that their proposals will ensure that legitimate and high-quality universities will be protected from the rise in overseas student numbers and the consequent key income flow from their higher fees. They also plan to exempt those colleges who qualify for “highly trusted sponsor status”.

The package of measures will include a new English-language test for prospective students; an academic progress test for those applying to extend their study stay in Britain; and a further reduction in the 10-hour limit (which was previously 20 hours) that an overseas student on a “below-degree” level course can work. There is also likely to be a curb on the number of dependents they can bring with them.

In what could prove disastrous for universities competing for students against the likes of Australia and Canada, further ‘nail in the coffin’ restrictions are expected on the 38,000 overseas students who graduate in Britain and are then allowed to stay on to work after their studies under the Tier 1 post study visa.

The newly emphasised ‘drive to ensure students return overseas after their course finishes’ will mean students may be required to leave the UK and apply for a new visa to further their studies, as well as demonstrate evidence of progression to a higher level course.

The government also announced plans to improve the inspection and accreditation of the education sector, to ‘ensure the courses offered by private institutions are of the highest quality’.

The Immigration Minister, Damian Green, told the Mail on Sunday that student visas had been handed out to those who were illiterate, of no fixed abode, or who thought that hospitality management “enabled someone to work in a hospital”.

A number of universities have real concerns about the impact of the immigration cap. Professor Steve Smith, president of vice-chancellors’ umbrella group, Universities UK, and vice-chancellor of Exeter University recently noted in the Guardian that the cap:

‘..could be a serious blow to the UK market in the face of huge competition from other countries that are investing in higher education… with the investment that competitor countries such as the US and China are putting into universities makes them more likely to poach staff at British universities. All of which amounts to a serious worry.’

Universities UK said that the consultation over student visas had already caused considerable uncertainty as colleges were already recruiting students for the next academic year: “We do not think that international students should be counted as migrants. They are not here for economic reasons, their time in the UK does not count towards any later application for settlement, unlike workers, and they have no recourse to public funds,” chief executive Nicola Dandridge said.

“International student recruitment is a major success story for the UK.”

James Pitman, the managing director of Study Group recently pointed out in the Financial Times, that any reduction in student numbers would be ‘disastrous for the UK’s fragile economy’ given that education and training exports are worth almost 40 Billion – representing the second biggest contributor to the UK’s net balance of payments behind financial Services.

See also:

Government lays down plans to reform UK student visa system and launch public consultation

Government commission research on the ‘value UK overseas trade and investment in higher and further education and research’

Consultation on Tier 4 Student Visas announced by Home Office

Vince Cable says immigration cap is damaging British industry  

UK Immigration Cap could damage higher education

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: 

info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk

Spread the Word, like or share this page, your friends will also love it and thanks for it.



Do you employ foreign workers? Don't risk a £20,000 fine and a possible custodial sentence. We can advice on Entrepreneur Visas, Investor Visas and Home Office sponsor licence compliance for your business. Use the button below to schedule an appointment...

About

Immigration Adviser, Speaker and Author See also: www.LinkedIn.com Profile - http://www.linkedin.com/profile/edit?trk=hb_tab_pro_top www.Ecademy.com Profile: http://www.ecademy.com/account.php?id=110038 http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/14119859749/

13 Responses to “British MPs voice ‘profound concern’ over Home Office plans to bar foreign students”
Read them below or add one

  1. Thank you for your comments – you should also write to your local MP’s to voice your concerns.

  2. Naveed says :

    UK’s economy gets 40 billion because of these students and if we divide 40 billion by 20000 its 2 million jobs of £20,000 each. Imagine with all that recession if you take away this from the economy. I have paid thousands of pounds on my education here and believe me the jobs that students do hardly pay half of their bills and for the rest half money is coming from their own countries. So whatever they earn spend mostly in the UK, so its a win win for uk. I think the burden UK is facing is because of tax thieves living in the country they don’t pay any taxes and claim the money from government.
    A lot of students that were thinking of coming to Uk for studies are either looking for canada or Australia. The government is killing the hen that lays golden eggs, hope they realize it.

  3. For student visa holders who do two jobs to get around the 20 hour rule, it should be noted that the UK Border Agency can access tax and NI records to check on earnings. Payslips and P60’s can also reveal second jobs or other earnings.
    Students bring billions of pounds into the UK economy, so whilst there may be flaws in the system the government should take care not to throw the baby out with the bath water.

  4. For student visa holders who do two jobs to get around the 20 hour rule, it should be noted that the UK Border Agency can access tax and NI records to check on earnings. Payslips and P60’s can also reveal second jobs or other earnings.

  5. Patricia Fagan says :

    Unfortunately, I agree with the poster above.
    I know of individuals here in the uk who are here on a student visa, they work in the care sector and work far more than the 20hrs per week in term time.

    This is achieved by working at more than one or even two establishments. It has transpired that some of these individuals have gone from one shift in one home straight to a shift in another home, agreeing to finishing 1/2 hr. early at one home to start 1/2 hr. later at the next. this is not safe practice and means the individual is not fresh for the shift.

    Unfotunately the system is abused, with individuals freely admitting that they have come to the uk on a student visa because that is the only way that they could gain entry into the uk. then they stay on taking one course after another to remain here, usualy the course that they are taking is not relevant to the health care sector.

    Sadly, the system that has allowed this situation and the individuals that are concerned overshadow the migrant workers here on a work visa and whose contribution to the sector is so valued.

  6. Patricia Fagan says :

    Unfornately, I agree with the poster above.
    I know of individuals here in the uk who are here on a student visa, they work in the care sector and work far more than the 20hrs per week in term time.

    This is achieved by working at more than one or even two establishments. It has transpired that some of these individuals have gone from one shift in one home straight to a shift in another home, agreeing to finishing 1/2 hr. early at one home to start 1/2 hr. later at the next. this is not safe practice and means the individual is not fresh for the shift.

    Unfotunately the system is abused, with individuals freely admitting that they have come to the uk on a student visa because that is the only way that they could gain entry into the uk. then they stay on taking one course after another to remain here, usualy the course that they are taking is not relevant to the health care sector.

    Sadly, the system that has allowed this situation and the individuals that are concerned overshadow the migrant workers here on a work visa and whose contribution to the sector is so valued.

  7. […] British MPs voice ‘profound concern’ over Home Office plans to bar foreign students […]

  8. Ma. Fidela Retazo says :

    I don’t agree that foreign students will be stopped to study in UK. A person have a choice to study and work wherever he or she wants. As long as the country is allowing foreign students to enroll in the colleges and universities and work part time. I believe it is necessary for them to take English Exam because UK’s first language is English and if that’s the requirement.

    Most foreign students had a degree from their country come to UK to continue their study. Some took vocational course and some took masters.

    Foreign students contribute to the economy of the country. If they are staying in UK they pay more in renting a flat because they are not allowed for council flat which is cheaper. They pay tax and national insurance if they are employed.

    With regards to unemployment, it is not only in UK but also anywhere in the world. UK Citizens are lucky to have a job without finishing college. Unlike where I lived, you need to finish your study in college to get a better job and with a better pay.

  9. […] of the UK Parliament expressed alarm this week as the Home Secretary announced plans to close the door on up to 120,000 international […]

  10. Michael Green says :

    I agree that student who want to study English language courses should get “student visitor” visa. I think it won’t be great loss if all below degree courses would be closed or seriously restricted.

    However, I strongly oppose any curbs on university students. If someone come here to study for BA, MA/Ms or PHD they are highly skilled and do not claim any benefits. It’s ok to further restrict their right to work but it is crazy to require them to leave the country if they want to apply for new course or extend their student visa. If someone decides to study MA after BA or PHD after MA they should be able to to do it comfortably. If they leave country to apply then they would consider to apply to other countries as well. If government is concerned with numbers of university students, why not increase overseas tuition fees?

    The closure of below degree courses alone, would reduce migration by about 120.000 ! So my message is – restrict below degree courses but don’t restrict university degree level courses. Especially the proposal that students must leave the country to apply for new student visa is crazy. There is already “student visitor” visa – make it for all below degree courses or close them altogether. Don’t punish university students and universities.

  11. […] British MPs voice ‘profound concern’ over Home Office plans to bar foreign students […]

  12. I agree with the move to bar foreign students,there are just too many poeple here in the name of student visa,most of whom don’t even attend classes,or do what they came here for,others do a lot more hours of work than they are surposed to do,some come here for courses they could have done in their own country and would have cost a lot less there,but still come here knowing they can some how stay on if they come in here,lots of poeple are looking for jobs,but we end up not having any because those who are not surposed to take them are doing so,are British poeple trying to say there is no other way for us to get money than only from foreign students who come in here and still bring their dependants to use the already puplic services that is now in short supply,yes they should be bared,and there should also be another system in place to get rid of those abusing the system,and sent back to their countries.

  13. […] British MPs voice ‘profound concern’ over Home Office plans to bar foreign students […]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked by *.

You must beLogged in to post a comment.