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Britain will limit settlement to ‘brightest and best’ migrants under new plans | Immigration Matters

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Britain is set to change the rules in order to give priority to the “brightest and the best” immigrants who can ‘contribute’ under new plans to cut the number of foreigners settling in the UK, the Immigration Minister has said.

Damian Green is widely expected this week to outline the principles behind the Government’s new “selective” immigration policy that will give preferential treatment to investors, entrepreneurs and world-class artists, dancers, musicians and academics.

Under the planned reforms “fewer but better” immigrants will be allowed to settle in the UK, with those who lack the skills to “help drive economic growth” or contribute to UK culture facing greater scrutiny.

In an interview with The Sunday Times Mr Green said:

“What we need is a system that…goes out to seek those people who are either going to create jobs or wealth or add to the high-level artistic and cultural aspirations we have.

“Getting the number down is the absolute key but what I am aiming at is fewer and better.”

The Conservative MP said those wishing to live in Britain will have to show “genuine serious usefulness to British society” and prove they are not totally dependent on benefits.

He added:

“We want permanently to make Britain the most attractive country in the world for the brightest and the best. The era of mass immigration is over.”

According to Mr Green, the UK turned down 385,000 visas last year, detected 27,000 forged documents and is currently stopping 1,000 people getting on a UK-bound plane each month. Source: Press Association and The Sunday Times.

The coalition government shelved Labour’s ‘earned citizenship’ scheme when it came to power, but has always pledged to cut the numbers of migrants moving from temporary migrants to permanent settlement.

The details of the proposals are expected to be outlined this week by the Immigration Minister and will be published by Immigration Matters. However, the message seems clear that all but the highly skilled or investors will find it more difficult to obtain indefinite leave to remain in the UK.

The news will be a bitter blow to thousands of Tier 2 working migrants expecting to qualify for permanent residence after 5 years and eventually a British passport or UK naturalisation. However, the report did not confirm whether or not any Immigration Rule changes on settlement will be retrospective.

The moves will do nothing to stem the tide of migration from Eastern European countries such as Poland, although working restrictions on Bulgarian and Romanians will remain until the end of 2013.

Changes to English language tests for applications under Tiers 1, 2 and 4 of the points-based system announced by UKBA today 

UKBA tighten English language test requirement on Tier 1 and 2 working visa applications in the UK

Employment restrictions for Bulgarians and Romanians extended until end of 2013

7 tips for completing a Yellow Card BR1 application to work and study in the UK

If you need any immigration advice or help with Sponsorship or Work Permits, Visa, ILR/Settlement, Citizenship, dependant visa or an appeal against a refusal please email: info@immigrationmatters.co.uk or visit www.immigrationmatters.co.uk 

Majestic College offer special packages for EU students. They also have a number of employers looking for staff right now and are willing to employ Bulgarians and Romanians.

For more information call Joanna on 0208 207 1020 or email info@majesticcollege.org

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11 Responses to “Britain will limit settlement to ‘brightest and best’ migrants under new plans”
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  1. You are correct in your observation. The reason people marrying EEA citizens get a better deal is that EU law trumps UK Rules! EU laws are also more generous towards family migration. If you were marrying a Pole/German who lives in the UK you would be here now watching Maria Sharapova at Wimbledon!
    See also: Immigration clampdown announced – if you want to marry a foreigner and live in the UK together you must earn £18,600

  2. Hello, my name is Tata. I am from Russia. Right now i am waiting in Russia for a fiancé visa to UK. My fiancé is a British Citizen and we have been dating for almost 2 years for now. We met very often in different countries and also i went to UK to visit him and meet his family. We are going to get married this year. SO i applied for a fiancé visa in UK in Moscow visa center. We have been waiting now for almost 50 working days. I do understand that the embassy and visa centers are having a huge amount of applications from people who want to visit the Olympics 2012. And that that is why embassy workers cannot give an e-mail answers also as fast as before when it was not a summer time and they were not that busy there. There is basically one main question that i was wondering about: There are people who are applying for EEA family permit and who are married to EU citizens who live in UK… so they are getting their visas in 2 weeks the most, and their visas are valid for 6 month, but after that they can easily apply for a settlement visa through UK. So, why do people who have relationship with British Citizens and are going to get married, need to wait that long (up to 120 working days – that equals 6 month without seeing each other) , and these time is very hard and giving lots of emotional paint to those couples who love each other very much. Why doesn’t the government give priority to their own citizens? and allowing the EEA family members easily settle in UK? Are there going to be any changes taken for this case?

  3. […] is set to change the rules in order to give priority to the “brightest and the best” immigrants who can ‘contribute’ under new plans to cut the number of foreigners settling in the […]

  4. […] Britain will limit settlement to ‘brightest and best’ migrants under new plans […]

  5. […] Britain will limit settlement to ‘brightest and best’ migrants under new plans […]

  6. […] Britain will limit settlement to ‘brightest and best’ migrants under new plans […]

  7. […] priority to the “brightest and the best” immigrants who can ‘contribute’ under new plans to cut the number of foreigners settling and applying for British Citizenship in the UK, the Immigration Minister recently […]

  8. […] Britain will limit settlement to ‘brightest and best’ migrants under new plans […]

  9. […] expected, the UK Border Agency has confirmed earlier rumours published by Immigration Matters on reforming the route to settlement or UK naturalisation with the creation of a ‘sustainable […]

  10. […] regarding these changes, which are also planned for April, will be made as soon as possible. Changes to the Family Route will also be announced in due […]

  11. […] expected, the UK Border Agency has confirmed earlier rumours published by Immigration Matters on reforming the route to settlement with the creation of a ‘sustainable selective immigration […]

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