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Albert Einstein’s 1933 UK immigration landing card found, but would he have been allowed entry in 2011? | Immigration Matters

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A fascinating piece of history in the form of a British landing card relating to Albert Einstein’s escape from Nazi Germany has been discovered and put on display for the first time at the UK Border Agency’s national museum in Liverpool.

The Jewish physicist fled from his homeland when Adolf Hitler came to power. A bounty was put on his head by the Nazis, who named him an enemy of the regime.

Landing cards were completed by all passengers arriving in Britain. Einstein’s card is proof of his journey from Ostende, Belgium to Dover on 26 May 1933. On the reverse, he wrote that he was bound for Oxford.

After nearly 80 years stored at Heathrow Airport, it was discovered by curators from the museum, also known as ‘Seized! The Border and Customs Uncovered’.

Assistant curator Lucy Gardner said:

‘We didn’t know this landing card ever existed until we visited UK Border Agency officers at Heathrow. We were keen on acquiring any documents relating to immigration, but were stunned to find paperwork relating to such a prominent historical figure as Albert Einstein.

‘What’s remarkable is that the landing card bears his signature, has his profession as “professor” and lists his nationality at Swiss. This shows how Einstein had renounced his German citizenship only weeks earlier in angry reaction to Nazi policies.

‘This tiny piece of paper brings to life Einstein’s escape from the Nazis to England. This country became a safe haven for him until he eventually settled in the US.’

Seized! The Border and Customs Uncovered is located in Liverpool’s Merseyside Maritime Museum. For more information and opening times, see the Merseyside Maritime Museum website.

More details of the landing card: www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/einstein

Albert Einstein’s landing card will go on display at the Seized! gallery at Merseyside Maritime Museum on Tuesday 10 May at 10.30am. Curators will hold the card for photographs and are available for interviews. Source: UK Border Agency.

One wonders how Albert Einstein would have been treated had he landed at Dover as a foreigner today (there was no EU/EEA in 1933) with very little paperwork?

Would he have been granted asylum or fast tracked back to a ‘safe’ Germany or Switzerland?

Presumably he would qualify under Tier 1 of the points based system as an ‘exceptional talent’!

Just for fun, tell Immigration Matters what you think would have happened to Albert Einstein arriving today?  It’s not ‘rocket science’!

What questions would have been posed, which under current rules may have excluded him from entry to the UK?

See article:

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website 

See article:

 

UK Border Agency launch new website

The newly revised UK Border Agency website has a better look and feel and navigation seems faster, but previously published links to specific pages of the site may no longer exist.

For instance, the link for European Workers is now:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/applying/

The link for ‘Bulgarian and Romanian nationals‘ is:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/work-permits/

The UK Border Agency and Home Office website contains a vast amount of information which can be difficult to wade your way through the guidance and Immigration Rules.

The navigation section for European workers from Bulgaria and Romania also appears to have been simplified although finding specific information is still a challenge.

Confusion remains over the need for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for BR1 Yellow Cards as students to take out Comprehensive Sickness Insurance cover. 

The BR1 Form in Section 9 states:

‘If sections 4 (Students) and 5 (Self-sufficient) have been completed: evidence of ‘Comprehensive Sickness Insurance’ cover in the UK and funds to show you are economically self-sufficient, e.g. a bank statement.’

In other words, the paragraph means you need comprehensive sickness insurance only if you are applying under both ‘student’ and ‘self sufficient’ sections.

Nevertheless, student applicants are being asked to take out private medical insurance policies and are being refused if they fail to supply the correct cover.

What is the correct insurance cover?

One insurance company manager told Immigration Matters that he has been trying to get clarification on the exact requirements from the UK Border Agency for several weeks.

Active Quote offers an easy to use online quotation and application system, but also has telephone support from advisers who are on hand to answer questions.

To obtain a quotation for Comprehensive Sickness Insurance visit the Active Quote website

See also:

Rules for European workers in the UK

Why do international students choose to study in the UK?

HOW TO FIND APPLICATION FORMS FOR A ‘YELLOW’ OR ‘BLUE’ CARD REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE ON THE UK BORDER AGENCY WEBSITE

If you would like more information on vocational courses suitable for Bulgarians and Romanians applying for a yellow card, email info@immigrationmatters.co.uk

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6 Responses to “Albert Einstein’s 1933 UK immigration landing card found, but would he have been allowed entry in 2011?”
Read them below or add one

  1. Karoley says :

    Quality question! I don’t think Einstein would be allowed anything in the UK if he was running away from Bulgaria or Romania these days, ha.

  2. Quality question! I don’t think Einstein would be allowed anything in the UK if he was running away from Bulgaria or Romania these days, ha!

  3. Yes, a silly question but maybe you are missing the point! Mind you, is time travel possible?

  4. GT.Ches says :

    Albert Einstein’s 1933 UK immigration landing card found, but would he have been allowed entry in 2011?…Yes, as Germany is part of the EU pretty silly question really.

  5. […] Albert Einstein’s 1933 UK immigration landing card found, but would he have been allowed entry in … […]

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